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Our

Glossary


We recognize that how jewelry is made, and where and how the materials are sourced, have an impact on people and the environment. Because of this impact, efforts to protect ecosystems and empower people all along the jewelry supply chain need to be in place.

To explain our role in these efforts, we’ve used consistent, accurate language to describe what our company is doing to encourage positive outcomes.

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Our

Glossary


We recognize that how jewelry is made, and where and how the materials are sourced, have an impact on people and the environment. Because of this impact, efforts to protect ecosystems and empower people all along the jewelry supply chain need to be in place.

To explain our role in these efforts, we’ve used consistent, accurate language to describe what our company is doing to encourage positive outcomes.

Use this glossary to better understand jewelry- and sustainability-related terms.


In some cases, we’ve written our own definitions because the term applies to our specific practices or there is no commonly shared definition in the jewelry industry. Additionally, we refer to definitions proposed by the Glossary Project. This is an independent industry initiative with the goal of “eliminating ambiguity in key jewelry terms, when/where efforts are underway to establish a shared definition.”


Sustainable Designers


Our Sustainable Designers are featured artists who engage in materials sourcing and studio practices that include at least five of these nine principles:

  1. Hand-made, local manufacturing
  2. Verifiable low-waste studio practices
  3. Fairmined certified gold or silver or similar artisanally mined precious metals from secure sources
  4. Certified recycled precious metals
  5. Verifiable artisanally mined gemstones traceable to the country where mined
  6. Verifiable artisanally mined gemstones traceable to the country and the mine
  7. Reclaimed or post-consumer diamonds and gemstones
  8. Renewable energy to power manufacturing and office processes
  9. Actively engaged in improving the jewelry industry (advocating for transparency, traceability, supporting efforts to raise awareness, supporting/participating in on-the-ground initiatives)

Requirement: To be considered a Sustainable Designer, one must make a public statement identifying the steps they are taking to continuously improve their practices.

Note: Sustainable design principles are part of a dynamic landscape of strategies available to jewelry designers.


Environmentally Conscious


For us, showing concern for the environment and acting on that concern is a priority. We use consideration for the environment as a core principle when we select our Sustainable Designers. Additionally, concern for the environment needs to be part of core business practices—like heating and cooling, paper use, and water consumption.


Ethical Jewelry


Ethical jewelry has everything to do with the sourcing of materials and primary business practices. Throughout our website we use this term, but ultimately it is synonymous with our Sustainable Designer definition.

Glossary Project Definition: Guided by principles that facilitate environmental and human well-being and avoid practices that harm.


Ethically Sourced


The terms “ethical jewelry” or “ethically sourced materials” mean that the designers to whom we apply the term are making a deliberate choice between one material or another, or one source over another, for explicit social or environmental reasons. These designers can verify from whom and where they source their materials. When they can’t, which is the case with some gemstones and other materials, they explain why. Several designers also publicly recognize the need for improvement within the jewelry industry and have a proven record of active engagement to create change.

Sometimes, Robert Goodman Jewelers engages in the direct sourcing of materials like gemstones. When we do this, we prioritize vendors who have made a commitment to give back to source communities in some way and disclose what the give-back policy is. Other criteria we look for is the disclosure of the mine (if possible), the country of origin, evidence of a committed relationship with the source community, and engagement with non-governmental organizations working in mining communities.

Ethically sourcing the jewelry we carry in our store means considering our customers and providing them with choices in jewelry designs, materials, price range. Additionally, we support designers with small businesses and local impact.


Fairmined


We carry a selection of jewelry produced with Fairmined-certified gold by licensed designers.

Glossary Project Definition: A label applied to gold that is sourced exclusively from artisanal and small-scale mining organizations that meet the requirements of the Fairmined Standard written by the Alliance for Responsible Mining (ARM). This standard attempts to improve trading conditions and environmental sustainability for producers in developing countries.


Recycled


We understand that “recycled,” typically understood as a solution to waste, is confusing in a jewelry context. In fine jewelry, the materials, precious metals, and gemstones do not fit the conventional thinking about recycling as a solution to waste. Instead, it is important to understand that jewelry materials have always been recycled—but they only really represent an alternative to waste if the actual jewelry was previously owned and worn, but no longer wanted, or, dental fillings and e-waste. Generally, scrap and already mined precious metals have always been considered a supply when making new jewelry. This means that for jewelry, “recycled” has the most meaning if it can be verified to be from post-consumer sources.

Glossary Project Definition: A term applied to metals and gemstones purchased or used by consumers (post-consumer), or a byproduct of manufacturing or finished goods that were never in circulation (pre-consumer), that are reused in the manufacturing of new products. Bullion containing any non-recycled metal or manufacturing byproduct reintroduced back into the same production line are not recycled.


Responsible Practices


  • Customers: We’re happy to serve anyone and everyone. You can find Robert Goodman Jewelers listed in the Gayborhood Directory as a safe, LGBTQ+-inclusive business.
  • Environment: We use recycled paper and LED lighting where practical, and we have a short commute from our home to Robert Goodman Jewelers.
  • Community: We see supporting the local community as a responsible practice.
  • Designers: We support all artists, especially Sustainable Designers.

Sustainable / Sustainability


At Robert Goodman Jewelers, we use these terms when referring to designers we carry who meet five out of nine principles that pertain to the broader concept of sustainability.

Glossary Project Definition: Practices that protect environmental integrity and promote human health in the sourcing, production, sale, and distribution of jewelry.*

*The processes related to sourcing, production, sale, and distribution of jewelry components can be sustainable. However, extractive practices of finite resources in the jewelry industry such as gold and diamond mining are inherently unsustainable.

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